New Federal Food Standards Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Schools

A new study has found that the 2012 federal standards requiring schools to provide healthier meals has significantly increased fruit and vegetable consumption among school-aged children.

The study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that following the implementation of the federal standards, fruit selection increased by 23% and consumption of vegetables increased by 16%. The study also found that there was no increased food waste, contradicting some anecdotal reports that had been used to argue for a weakening of the standards. The increase in fruit and vegetable consumption should lead to health benefits for school-aged children across the country. Click here to read more about the study’s findings.

The finding bolsters the importance of providing healthier meals for all students.  Several of the same researchers are currently studying the impact of the 2010 state school nutrition law in Massachusetts, and we look forward to seeing those results in the fall.

One Comment on “New Federal Food Standards Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Schools

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